Wednesday, January 17, 2007

Book Recommendation

I'm reading a really good book right now - The Knitting Circle by Ann Hood - it's about a woman trying to recover from the death of her daughter who joins a knitting group. She learns that no one is without pain in their lives no matter what it looks like from the outside. For me, this book is very appropriate - this month marks 3 years since my mom died from heart bypass surgery. And that is also when knitting became a huge part of my life - I remember seeing a couple of women in the surgical waiting room knitting scarves - I thought - hmmm I used to do that and never gave it much thought. After the funeral, I had an overwhelming desire to knit so I went to my LYS and spent a fortune on a Noro Silk Garden blanket. Whenever I was feeling really bad, which was mostly all the time, I was knitting that blanket. And after I finished that blanket I knit the most complicated Rowan fair isle cardigan ever. It was beautiful! I gave it to a friend for her birthday. After my mom died, there were days I didn't get dressed, there were days I didn't get out of bed but I always, always knit every single day and have for most of the last 3 years. I've learned that the rhythm of the needles really can heal a broken heart.

9 comments:

Sandra said...

I've got that book on reserve at the library - good to hear a positive review. I'll look forward to reading it.

Catherine said...

Wow, what a great way to remember and honour your mother. Last year was the first time I picked up my needles since my grandmother taught me as a child. I think of her each time I knit.

Terry said...

I was touched by your entry. After both my parents died of cancer three weeks apart I was very lost. It was then I started knitting again too. Then just last September my little sister died of breast cancer. Again the knitting saved my sanity. You're right. The rythym of the needles is very soothing. My prayers are with you for your loss. It doesn't matter how long ago it was. Sometimes it seems like yesterday doesn't it?

Connie said...

It does seem like yesterday lots of times but when I really think it's been 3 years I think - where have I been? I'm so sorry for your losses - take care!

Iraj Seyf said...

Sorry to read that you are still so sad about your mother. But for a second, consider, like life, death is " true", i.e. life would become meaningless if none of us died. For a second, just imagine what would happen if nobody dies in the next 500 years!

Meghan said...

What a great entry, Connie!

Thinking of you...

Anonymous said...

Connie - your mum would be so proud of you. Look at all you have accomplished, knitting was meant to lead you on this path. I lost my younger brother James when he was 21 in a motorcycle accident. Hw would have been 45 on the 21st of this month, not a day goes bye when I don't miss him, then I think how fortunate I was to have had him in my life.
God Bless.

Anonymous said...

I love your blog. Your socks looks amazing and I would love to have a pair on my feet. Quilting provided similar comfort for me after I miscarried a baby. That was almost 4 years ago and I'm still quilting. I've tried knitting but I just can't seem to to do it. I won't give up. Your blog has inspired me to try again.

Anonymous said...

Knitting can help in so many ways. I started knitting again in college when my grandmother died of a heart attack. She had thought me to knit when I was six, and strating to knit again made me feel closer to her after her death.
She was a very generous woman and gave a lot to local charities. Two years ago, I was going through a nasty merger at work, and knitting helped relieve some of the stress. I then decided to put my stress to good use and knit for charities. I know my grandmother agreed with that idea.
Have a look at my new socks on my blog ;)